Walking home in Hong Kong

A short movie capturing the experience of my Friday evening commute. This highlights the lens of a newcomer to Hong Kong. Walking Home in Hong Kong from Carissa Carter on...

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Identity

What is the meaning of identity?  Do credit and debit cards contain our identities? I collected text and hand-drawn responses on a range of questions related to identity from people around the world via Amazon Mechanical Turk.  Their answers are presented on a large board that asks the visitor to swipe his or her credit card to initiate a sequence of flashing lights that eventually lands on a single response for the visitor to read. The piece...

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Visceral Credit Card Reader

Swipe your credit card and get rewarded with a satisfying bell and glowing blue light. This is a prototype I built to test a concept I’m working on that challenges people notions of personal information. The card swipe strikes a bell that is reminiscent of manual cash registers. This was unplanned but an interesting plus that I’ll pull through to the next version. Visceral Credit Card Reader from Carissa Carter on Vimeo. Close-up...

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BB Controller

Data data everywhere! We’re often presented with visualizations that highlight data that the graph author wants us to see. In this project, I explore data presentation through the construction of a user-driven controller. Rotate the controller in space and copper BBs connect various circuits. The user and randomness vie for control. Quasi-random, user-driven, data presentation from Carissa Carter on...

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Megapixel

Building on a fascination I have with pixels, I created the megapixel font out of redwood 4×4′s. Each character contains ten white pixels. I know this breaks every rule of typography creation and that there are many many things wrong with the image. I just wanted to experiment and make it fast. I was interested in using the same number of pixels per character. The redwood blocks are all of varying height to allow for pixelation...

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Plinko Floor

The Plinko Floor compresses slightly under each person standing on it, allowing balls to roll under individuals and indicate their presence.  I created it to subtly acknowledge other people in an elevator space, a place where we often actively ignore others and attempt to blend ourselves into the background. When placed in a public elevator, there was a high barrier to entry unless an actor was used to initially engage people. After engagement,...

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